How did blue-collar Rick Santorum expose Mitt Romney’s class problem?

"So what does it mean for the other guy, the guy whose ample deficiencies were brought to life in the paunchy form of Santorum? There will be much chatter now about Romney’s coming Etch-a-Sketch shake, the inevitable move to erase the contemporary conservative orthodoxies he’s embraced and whether that will cost him on the right. If you ask me, this isn’t really the right question. Romney will get the hardcore conservatives, no matter whom they voted for in the primaries, because the hardcore conservatives loathe, or perhaps simply fear, our president. I think of people like Bill Connor, an Army veteran and 2010 candidate for lieutenant governor in South Carolina who is now a practicing attorney there and was a leading Santorum supporter in the state. I checked in with him this afternoon and he was fully ready to back Romney come November. “I am very concerned with the things Barack Obama has done the past few years and am concerned that if he’s elected again there will be almost no check on what he would do in pushing us to the left, so I’m motivated to go in and vote for the Republican nominee,” Connor said. “I saw Rick Santorum as being more conservative across the board; there was more passion there. But I think as we move toward the general election the passion will be there to get someone more conservative than Barack Obama.”"

- Alec MacGillis, Farewell to Rick, Who Was Not Mitt

Photo courtesy of Salon

When will Santorum fold?
"More than any presidential candidate since maybe Gary Hart in 1984, Santorum vindicated the quixotic dreamers who struggle on despite invisible poll ratings, tin-cup financing, and the dismissive wisecracks from political insiders. Santorum was a throw-back candidate—not only with his 1950s social values, but also in his forged-by-necessity embrace of the most old-fashioned way of running for president. In Iowa, where he made his move in the polls only two weeks before the January 3 caucuses, Santorum campaigned everywhere, responded at (sometimes tedious) length to every voter question, and cheerfully deflected skeptical press queries like the one I posed to him in mid-December: “Some days, don’t you get discouraged?”"
- Walter Shapiro, The One Nice Thing About Rick Santorum’s Now-Doomed Campaign
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When will Santorum fold?

"More than any presidential candidate since maybe Gary Hart in 1984, Santorum vindicated the quixotic dreamers who struggle on despite invisible poll ratings, tin-cup financing, and the dismissive wisecracks from political insiders. Santorum was a throw-back candidate—not only with his 1950s social values, but also in his forged-by-necessity embrace of the most old-fashioned way of running for president. In Iowa, where he made his move in the polls only two weeks before the January 3 caucuses, Santorum campaigned everywhere, responded at (sometimes tedious) length to every voter question, and cheerfully deflected skeptical press queries like the one I posed to him in mid-December: “Some days, don’t you get discouraged?”"

- Walter Shapiro, The One Nice Thing About Rick Santorum’s Now-Doomed Campaign