Quote IconIt would be one thing if Brooks weren’t aware of the scope of poverty’s effects on kids. Ignorance might be a plausible excuse for suggesting such half-measures. But Brooks knows better. He describes the brutal, destiny-altering, cancerous effects of poverty … and suggests that we try some mild palliatives. It’s hard to tell if this is cruelty by omission or just a failure of nerve, but in either case, his prescriptions are embarrassingly inadequate.

David Brooks’ latest column offers some truly bizarre advice about how to help underprivileged children

Is it possible for love to exist across classes in America today?

"Emily (not her real name) didn’t have to work, but while she was looking for an internship at a TV studio, she found a job in a bookstore. She said she was grateful for her inherited wealth but did not earn it so would not use it. Sometimes, though, she’d dip into it to buy me things she thought I needed: a new leather jacket, hand-stiched cowboy boots, a wool sweater from Ireland. I was grateful for these things but felt undeserving. I’d never been around anyone with money before—someone who could just buy whatever she wanted whenever she wanted it."

—Andre Dubus III, “The Land of No: Love in class-riven America.

Should politicians focus their attention on the middle class?

"The idea that 90 or 95 percent of Americans are struggling may have achieved the status of conventional wisdom, but that doesn’t mean it’s correct. Indeed, it ultimately functions as a distraction: The attention we insist on paying to the overstated problems of the middle class come at the expense of the more critical challenge facing the poor."

—Scott Winship, “Stop Feeling Sorry for the Middle Class! They’re Doing Just Fine.

Does Mitt Romney really believe the poor are “taken care of?”

"After all, Republicans keep saying the poor get off easy, because they don’t pay income taxes. And Republicans keep proposing budgets that would result in massive cuts to safety net programs. Meanwhile, new government statistics suggest that poverty is at record levels – and would be even worse if not for government programs already stretched to the limit.”

- Johnathan Cohn, “Daily Deadline: How Can a Poor Man Stand Mitt Romney?

For more, read the second-ever installment of the Daily Deadline, a new addition to Jonathan Cohn’s popular TNR blog.

Photo courtesy of The Urban Twist

Yesterday, TNR’s Jonathan Cohn broke down the numbers on the new Census Bureau report that suggested more Americans lived in poverty in 2010 than in any other time.
Today he has charts on one of the most interesting details of yesterday’s figures, the rate of uninsured. Could Obamacare be working?
The Daily has a great feature today, complete with more graphs and showing income inequality through a number of different perspectives, by percentage in regions of the United States and race and ethnicity, just to name a few.
Courtesy of thedailyfeed
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Yesterday, TNR’s Jonathan Cohn broke down the numbers on the new Census Bureau report that suggested more Americans lived in poverty in 2010 than in any other time.
Today he has charts on one of the most interesting details of yesterday’s figures, the rate of uninsured. Could Obamacare be working?
The Daily has a great feature today, complete with more graphs and showing income inequality through a number of different perspectives, by percentage in regions of the United States and race and ethnicity, just to name a few.
Courtesy of thedailyfeed
Zoom Info

Yesterday, TNR’s Jonathan Cohn broke down the numbers on the new Census Bureau report that suggested more Americans lived in poverty in 2010 than in any other time.

Today he has charts on one of the most interesting details of yesterday’s figures, the rate of uninsured. Could Obamacare be working?

The Daily has a great feature today, complete with more graphs and showing income inequality through a number of different perspectives, by percentage in regions of the United States and race and ethnicity, just to name a few.

Courtesy of thedailyfeed

Amid a struggling economic recovery comes more dampening news. More people in America fell below the poverty line last year, according to new data released by the Census Bureau on Tuesday.

Check out Jonathan Cohn’s exclusive take on the recently released numbers (complete with more charts) here.

According to the report, the number of Americans currently in poverty jumped to 15.1 percent in 2010, a 17 year high, reports the Washington Post. That’s 46.2 million people in poverty, or 1 in 6 Americans. According to the Post, the total number of people living in poverty — defined in 2010 as at or below an income of $22,314 for a family of four — is now at the highest level in the 52 years the statistic has been collected. An additional 2.6 million people fell below the poverty line last year, reports the New York Times.

The figure is reported to be up from 43.6 million, or 14.3 percent of the population in 2009. This is the highest poverty level experienced in the United States since 1993. The ranks of the uninsured grew significantly in the past year as well.

The number of uninsured Americans grew steadily to 49.9 million, also a new all-time high after recent revisions to 2009 figures. The majority of losses in insurance coverage this year were due to working-age Americans who lost employer-provided insurance coverage.

All of this news, while not unexpected, is hot on the heels of a report recently released by the International Diabetes Federation showing that 368 million people worldwide currently suffer from Diabetes, a number so grim that it is drawing worldwide attention.

The disease kills every seven seconds, according to Bloomberg, a figure surely devastating to the overwhelmingly disproportionate number of uninsured afflicted by the disease.

Courtesy of CNNMoney