Should Obama’s campaign focus on inequality?
"For political purposes, it doesn’t much matter how an argument is received by people who are sure to support you. What really matters is its effect on voters who may be open to persuasion. And for Obama, that means white voters."
-William Galston, Why the President’s Campaign Shouldn’t Focus on Inequality
(Photo Courtesy of Getty Images)
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Should Obama’s campaign focus on inequality?

"For political purposes, it doesn’t much matter how an argument is received by people who are sure to support you. What really matters is its effect on voters who may be open to persuasion. And for Obama, that means white voters."

-William Galston, Why the President’s Campaign Shouldn’t Focus on Inequality

(Photo Courtesy of Getty Images)

Should Obama run as a populist?

"Obama is nobody’s idea of “just folks.” He’s too cosmopolitan, multiracial, professorial, self-controlled, and physically fit to present himself as an incarnation of the American common man. His otherness has always inclined him toward an E Pluribus Unum approach rather than Us Against Them."

- Geoffrey Kabaservice, Should Obama Run as a Populist? Part One of a TNR Symposium

Photo courtesy of The Moderate Voice

The hedge fund world loved Obama in 2008—and now it viscerally despises him. What caused the big split?

TNR Senior Editor Alec MacGillis explains why hedge fund honchos turned against Obama in the cover story of The New Republic’s latest issue, on newsstands now.

"Four years later, that bond is broken. The hedge fund community has overwhelmingly shifted its backing to the Republicans: Mitt Romney has so far outraised Obama by a four-to-one ratio among hedge fund employees, pulling in more than $500,000—not to mention the seven-figure checks his super PAC has received from several top fund managers."

— Alec MacGillis, “The Big Split: Why Hedge Fund Honchos Turned Against Obama

Mitt Romney’s response this week to President Obama’s populist speech in Kansas was to warn that Obama “seeks to replace our merit-based society with an entitlement society.”

Daniel Henninger in the op-ed pages of the Wall Street Journal took it a bit farther, suggesting that Obama’s speech was more like “what you’d expect to hear in Caracas or Buenos Aires” than in Osawatomie, Kansas.

Read Alec MacGillis’s blog post on what the GOP may learn from watching Brazil, one of the world’s largest entitlement states, emerge as a player on the world economic stage.

Photo courtesy of the Guardian.