Quote IconThe best reasons to want a labor union, or universal health care, or Social Security are to be free of worry, want, and privation, and to be out from under the hand of the boss.

The New Puritans. By Mark Oppenheimer.

How should liberals approach Occupy Wall Street?
"To draw on the old cliché, the enemy of my enemy is not necessarily my friend. Just because liberals are frustrated with Wall Street does not mean that we should automatically find common cause with a group of people who are protesting Wall Street. Indeed, one of the first obligations of liberalism is skepticism—of governments, of arguments, and of movements. And so it is important to look at what Occupy Wall Street actually believes and then to ask two, related questions: Is their rhetoric liberal, or at least a close cousin of liberalism? And is this movement helpful to the achievement of liberal aims?"
-The Editors, “Protests and Power,” in TNR’s November 3rd issue.
Images courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.
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How should liberals approach Occupy Wall Street?
"To draw on the old cliché, the enemy of my enemy is not necessarily my friend. Just because liberals are frustrated with Wall Street does not mean that we should automatically find common cause with a group of people who are protesting Wall Street. Indeed, one of the first obligations of liberalism is skepticism—of governments, of arguments, and of movements. And so it is important to look at what Occupy Wall Street actually believes and then to ask two, related questions: Is their rhetoric liberal, or at least a close cousin of liberalism? And is this movement helpful to the achievement of liberal aims?"
-The Editors, “Protests and Power,” in TNR’s November 3rd issue.
Images courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.
Zoom Info
How should liberals approach Occupy Wall Street?
"To draw on the old cliché, the enemy of my enemy is not necessarily my friend. Just because liberals are frustrated with Wall Street does not mean that we should automatically find common cause with a group of people who are protesting Wall Street. Indeed, one of the first obligations of liberalism is skepticism—of governments, of arguments, and of movements. And so it is important to look at what Occupy Wall Street actually believes and then to ask two, related questions: Is their rhetoric liberal, or at least a close cousin of liberalism? And is this movement helpful to the achievement of liberal aims?"
-The Editors, “Protests and Power,” in TNR’s November 3rd issue.
Images courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.
Zoom Info

How should liberals approach Occupy Wall Street?

"To draw on the old cliché, the enemy of my enemy is not necessarily my friend. Just because liberals are frustrated with Wall Street does not mean that we should automatically find common cause with a group of people who are protesting Wall Street. Indeed, one of the first obligations of liberalism is skepticism—of governments, of arguments, and of movements. And so it is important to look at what Occupy Wall Street actually believes and then to ask two, related questions: Is their rhetoric liberal, or at least a close cousin of liberalism? And is this movement helpful to the achievement of liberal aims?"

-The Editors, “Protests and Power,” in TNR’s November 3rd issue.

Images courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Is “Occupy Wall Street” the next Tea Party…for the Left?
"The Tea Party, too, started in incoherence and blind rage, disconnected from other conservative activism, and featuring an unappealing, self-indulgent cast of characters who, like the young activists on Wall Street, represented only a tiny faction of the people they claimed to speak for. "
-Mark Schmitt. “Why Did Liberals Embrace ‘Occupy Wall Street’? (Hint: They’re Obsessed With the Tea Party.)”
Photo courtesy of MSNBC and Conservative Daily News.
Zoom Info
Is “Occupy Wall Street” the next Tea Party…for the Left?
"The Tea Party, too, started in incoherence and blind rage, disconnected from other conservative activism, and featuring an unappealing, self-indulgent cast of characters who, like the young activists on Wall Street, represented only a tiny faction of the people they claimed to speak for. "
-Mark Schmitt. “Why Did Liberals Embrace ‘Occupy Wall Street’? (Hint: They’re Obsessed With the Tea Party.)”
Photo courtesy of MSNBC and Conservative Daily News.
Zoom Info

Is “Occupy Wall Street” the next Tea Party…for the Left?

"The Tea Party, too, started in incoherence and blind rage, disconnected from other conservative activism, and featuring an unappealing, self-indulgent cast of characters who, like the young activists on Wall Street, represented only a tiny faction of the people they claimed to speak for. "

-Mark Schmitt. “Why Did Liberals Embrace ‘Occupy Wall Street’? (Hint: They’re Obsessed With the Tea Party.)”

Photo courtesy of MSNBC and Conservative Daily News.

The Electoral College has always been a source of controversy in American politics. This week, Pennsylvania Republicans are looking to shift the way states apportion votes in presidential elections by switching from winner-takes-all to the Maine Plan. The latter would award one electoral vote to the winner of each Congressional district, after which two are given to the winner of the state.

This development not only poses a huge threat to Democratic states in 2012 but is also a reminder of why the Electoral College was necessary in the first place.

(Hint: It originally sought to restore balance to a system that massively overrepresented small states).

Will the system that helped Obama secure a win in 2008 prove detrimental to liberal strongholds in the next election?

Courtesy of Wikipedia

The Supreme Court halted the execution of Texas prisoner, Duane Buck, on Thursday. While his lawyers are not disputing Buck’s guilt, they argue that the 1997 testimony by a psychologist claiming that blacks are more likely to pose threats to the public in the future unfairly influenced the jury.

Kate Black, one of Buck’s defense attorneys:

"No one should be put to death based on the the color of his or her skin. We are confident that the court will agree that our client is entitled to a fair sentencing hearing that is untainted by considerations of his race".

As evidenced by last Wednesday’s Republic Presidential Debate, Rick Perry’s celebration of capital punishment is echoed by much of this country. What’s more, TNR editors say that most liberals have long since abandoned their fight to abolish the death penalty in light of more polarizing domestic issues. Given the Supreme Court’s swift response, should Rick Perry be worried about how this affects his campaign and his longstanding belief in the “ultimate justice”?

Courtesy of Salon.com