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On March 29, 1945, FDR left the White House for the last time on a trip to Warm Springs, Georgia. He had first visited Warm Springs in the mid-1920s after hearing that the waters there had healing powers.  He hoped they would help him regain the use of his legs which were left paralyzed from a polio attack in 1921.

In 1926, FDR bought and renovated the old resort at Warm Springs, turning it into a state-of-the-art rehabilitation center for polio patients. Throughout his time as Governor of New York and President, FDR continued vacationing at Warm Springs. The cottage where he stayed became known as the “Little White House,” thanks to his frequent visits as president.

It was here that FDR went in April 1945 to rest and rejuvenate following the pressures of the 1944 campaign, the Yalta Conference, and the continued war effort.  On April 12, 1945, while sitting for a portrait by painter Elizabeth Shoumatoff, FDR suffered a massive stroke. He died a few hours later having never regained consciousness.

This photo is of FDR in Warm Springs, GA, 1931.

Can somebody born into great wealth, as Romney was, have a strong sense of social solidarity with or obligation towards the poor?
"Like Romney, [FDR and the Kennedys] were all part of the aristocracy. They also crusaded for economic justice, Roosevelt earning his peers’ scorn as a "class traitor" and the Kennedy clan eventually making the disadvantaged the focus of their political lives. Romney obviously feels more compassion than the unfortunately worded quote suggests, but just as obviously feels less compassion than either FDR or the Kennedys did."
—Jonathan Cohn, “What Romney Doesn’t Get, But FDR and the Kennedys Did”
Photo courtesy of Getty Images.
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Can somebody born into great wealth, as Romney was, have a strong sense of social solidarity with or obligation towards the poor?

"Like Romney, [FDR and the Kennedys] were all part of the aristocracy. They also crusaded for economic justice, Roosevelt earning his peers’ scorn as a "class traitor" and the Kennedy clan eventually making the disadvantaged the focus of their political lives. Romney obviously feels more compassion than the unfortunately worded quote suggests, but just as obviously feels less compassion than either FDR or the Kennedys did."

—Jonathan Cohn, “What Romney Doesn’t Get, But FDR and the Kennedys Did

Photo courtesy of Getty Images.

Conservatives hilariously exclude Reagan from the pattern of presidents who accepted a government role in the economy. Conservative mythology insists that Reagan must always be correct, so he is lauded for rejecting the twentieth century model of government, even though Reagan very much accepted the broad contours of the post New Deal state. Indeed, Reagan liked to boast that he voted for Franklin Roosevelt, and that the Democratic Party only went wrong sometime after FDR passed from the scene. Reagan trimmed government but he never even attempted to fundamentally challenge the basic role of government in regulating market failure or providing medical care to the poor and elderly.